Bike

IG vs. HG chains

HG stands for Hyper Glide, IG for InterGlide. Shimano first came out with HG chains in ’91. In ’94, Shimano went from 7 speed to 8 speed and in ’95 they introduced the IG drivetrain. The new IG replaced the old HG on the upper end Shimano lines. IG chains were designed to run specifically with IG chainrings and cassettes. In ’99, Shimano introduced the 9 speed drivetrain (or Mega 9). This included a new narrower chain, chainrings and cassette and they brought back the HG chain prefix. Got all that?

The main difference between IG and HG is the chain width. IG chain is 7.1 mm wide, HG 6.6 mm wide. (The old HG is 7.4 mm wide.)

Today, HG means 9 speed drivetrain. IG is pretty much for 8 speed drivetrains. As for the numbers that follow, the bigger the number, the better the chain (supposedly). For example, the HG-53 is Deore, HG-73 is LX and HG-93 is XT. The XTR chains are completely different. They start with CN-7700.

According to Shimano, you can run any IG chain with any HG cassette. But, as for the chainrings, ” The 9-speed chainring teeth are reprofiled for narrower chains, therefore you can not use an 8-speed chain [on Mega 9 chainrings]”.

Also something to consider: The mega 9 front derailler cage is narrower than an 8 speed cage. An 8-speed chain will not fit in a Mega 9 front derailler cage and a 9 speed chain is too narrow for an 8 speed front derailler, causing poor shifting between chainrings.

I will assume you are replacing your 8-speed cassette with another 8-speed cassette? If so, you will want to use an IG chain. If you go with a 9-speed cassette, of course you will need a 9-speed rear derailler and shifters if you want to use all nine. And then, to run a 9-speed chain, you will need 9-speed chainrings and a 9-speed front derailler. It’s pretty much all or nothing when upgrading to 9-speed.

Of course, this is all Shimano talk. There are other companies that make chains that work with Shimano parts and vice versa.

http://utahmountainbiking.com/Forum2017/viewtopic.php?t=18

IG vs. HG chains was last modified: July 12th, 2020 by Jovan Stosic

IG vs. HG chains

HG stands for Hyper Glide, IG for InterGlide. Shimano first came out with HG chains in ’91. In ’94, Shimano went from 7 speed to 8 speed and in ’95 they introduced the IG drivetrain. The new IG replaced the old HG on the upper end Shimano lines. IG chains were designed to run specifically with IG chainrings and cassettes. In ’99, Shimano introduced the 9 speed drivetrain (or Mega 9). This included a new narrower chain, chainrings and cassette and they brought back the HG chain prefix. Got all that?

The main difference between IG and HG is the chain width. IG chain is 7.1 mm wide, HG 6.6 mm wide. (The old HG is 7.4 mm wide.)

Today, HG means 9 speed drivetrain. IG is pretty much for 8 speed drivetrains. As for the numbers that follow, the bigger the number, the better the chain (supposedly). For example, the HG-53 is Deore, HG-73 is LX and HG-93 is XT. The XTR chains are completely different. They start with CN-7700.

According to Shimano, you can run any IG chain with any HG cassette. But, as for the chainrings, ” The 9-speed chainring teeth are reprofiled for narrower chains, therefore you can not use an 8-speed chain [on Mega 9 chainrings]”.

Also something to consider: The mega 9 front derailler cage is narrower than an 8 speed cage. An 8-speed chain will not fit in a Mega 9 front derailler cage and a 9 speed chain is too narrow for an 8 speed front derailler, causing poor shifting between chainrings.

I will assume you are replacing your 8-speed cassette with another 8-speed cassette? If so, you will want to use an IG chain. If you go with a 9-speed cassette, of course you will need a 9-speed rear derailler and shifters if you want to use all nine. And then, to run a 9-speed chain, you will need 9-speed chainrings and a 9-speed front derailler. It’s pretty much all or nothing when upgrading to 9-speed.

Of course, this is all Shimano talk. There are other companies that make chains that work with Shimano parts and vice versa.

http://utahmountainbiking.com/Forum2017/viewtopic.php?t=18

IG vs. HG chains was last modified: July 4th, 2020 by Jovan Stosic

Bicycle chain

Width

Chains come in 332 in (2.4 mm), 18 in (3.2 mm), 532 in (4.0 mm), or 316 in (4.8 mm) roller widths, the internal width between the inner plates. 18 in (3.2 mm) chains are typically used on bikes with a single rear sprocket: those with coaster brakes, hub gears, fixed gears such as track bicycles, or BMX bikes. Chains with 332 in (2.4 mm) wide rollers are generally used on bikes with derailleurs such as racing, touring, and mountain bikes.[17] Fixed sprockets and freewheels are also available in 332 in (2.4 mm) widths so fixed-gear and single-speed bikes can be set up to use the narrower and lighter 332 in (2.4 mm) chains. Finally, chains with 532 in (4.0 mm) wide rollers are used on freight bicycles and tricycles.

With derailleur equipped bicycles, the external width of the chain (measured at the connecting rivet) also matters, because chains must not be too wide for the cogset or they will rub on the next larger sprocket, or too narrow that they might fall between two sprockets. Chains can also be identified by the number of rear sprockets they can support, anywhere from 3 to 12, and the list below enables measuring a chain of unknown origin to determine its suitability.

  • 6 speed – 7.3 mm (932 in) (Shimano HG), 7.1 mm (932 in) (SRAM, Shimano IG)
  • 7 speed – 7.3 mm (932 in) (Shimano HG), 7.1 mm (932 in) (SRAM, Shimano IG)
  • 8 speed – 7.3 mm (932 in) (Shimano HG), 7.1 mm (932 in) (SRAM, Shimano IG)
  • 9 speed – 6.5 to 7.0 mm (14 to 932 in) (all brands)
  • 10 speed – 6.0 to 7.0 mm (14 to 932 in) (Shimano, Campagnolo)
  • 10 speed (Narrow) – 5.88 mm (732 in) (Campagnolo, KMC)
  • 10 speed (Narrow, Direction) – 5.88 mm (732 in) (Shimano CN-5700, CN-6700, CN-7900)
  • 11 speed – 5.5 to 5.62 mm (732 to 732 in) (Campagnolo, KMC, Shimano CN-9000)
  • 12 speed – 5.3 mm (1364 in) (SRAM)

The Wikibook, “Bicycle Maintenance and Repair”, has more details on this topic. Shimano uses the same chain types on 6, 7,and 8 speed designs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_chain

Bicycle chain was last modified: July 4th, 2020 by Jovan Stosic