Miscellaneous notes

Paulownia

Paulownia (/pɔːˈlniə/ paw-LOH-nee-ə) is a genus of seven to 17 species (depending on taxonomic authority) of flowering plants in the family Paulowniaceae, in the order Lamiales. They are present in much of China, south to northern Laos and Vietnam and are long cultivated elsewhere in eastern Asia, notably in Japan and Korea where they are native.

It was introduced to North America in 1844 from Europe and Asia where it was originally sought after as an exotic ornamental tree. Its fruits (botanically capsules) were also used as packaging material for goods shipped from East Asia to North America, leading to Paulownia groves where they were dumped near major ports. The tree has not persisted prominently in US gardens, in part due to its overwintering brown fruits that some consider ugly. In some areas it has escaped cultivation and is found in disturbed plots. Some US authorities consider the genus an invasive species, but in Europe, where it is also grown in gardens, it is not regarded as invasive.

The genus, originally Pavlovnia but now usually spelled Paulownia, was named in honour of Anna Paulowna, queen consort of The Netherlands (1795–1865), daughter of Tsar Paul I of Russia. It is also called “princess tree” for the same reason.

Paulownia trees produce as many as 20 million tiny seeds per year. However, the seeds are very susceptible to soil biota and only colonize well on sterile soils (such as after a high temperature wildfire). Well-drained soil is also essential. Successful plantations usually purchase plants that have been professionally propagated from root cuttings or seedlings. Although seeds, seedlings, and roots of even mature trees are susceptible to rot, the wood is not and is used for boat building and surfboards.

Trees can grow to maturity in under 10 years and produce strong, lightweight timber, good as firewood, with an even higher strength to weight ratio than balsa wood.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paulownia

Paulownia was last modified: November 22nd, 2020 by Jovan Stosic

George Mallory

George Herbert Leigh Mallory (18 June 1886 – 8 or 9 June 1924) was an English mountaineer who took part in the first three British expeditions to Mount Everest, in the early 1920s.

Born in Cheshire, Mallory was introduced to rock climbing and mountaineering as a student at Winchester College. After graduating from Magdalene College, Cambridge, he taught at Charterhouse School whilst honing his skills as a climber in the Alps and the English Lake District. Mallory served in the British Army during the First World War and fought at the Somme. After the war, he returned to Charterhouse before resigning to take part in the 1921 British Mount Everest reconnaissance expedition. In 1922, he took part in a second expedition to make the first ascent of the world’s highest mountain, in which his team achieved a record altitude of 26,980 ft (8,225 m) without supplemental oxygen.

During the 1924 expedition, Mallory and his climbing partner, Andrew “Sandy” Irvine, disappeared on the northeast ridge of Everest. The pair was last seen when they were about 800 vertical feet (245 m) from the summit. Mallory’s ultimate fate was unknown for 75 years, until his body was discovered on 1 May 1999 by an expedition that had set out to search for the climbers’ remains. Whether Mallory and Irvine reached the summit before they died remains a subject of speculation and continuing research.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Mallory

George Mallory was last modified: November 15th, 2020 by Jovan Stosic

ВО ОХРИД ИМА 1076 ДИВОГРАДБИ, 409 СЕ ВО ЗАШТИТЕН ПОЈАС, ПОКАЖА ОПШТИНСКИОТ РЕГИСТЕР

https://sdk.mk/index.php/dopisna-mrezha/vo-ohrid-ima-1076-divogradbi-409-se-vo-zashtiten-pojas-pokazha-opshtinskiot-register/

ВО ОХРИД ИМА 1076 ДИВОГРАДБИ, 409 СЕ ВО ЗАШТИТЕН ПОЈАС, ПОКАЖА ОПШТИНСКИОТ РЕГИСТЕР was last modified: December 15th, 2019 by Jovan Stosic