Dictionary

Dampen


Concise Oxford English Dictionary
dampen
■ verb
make damp.
make less strong or intense. ▶reduce the amplitude of (a sound source).

dampener noun

EngMac
dampen
навлажнува, потиснува (чувства), се натопува; навлажува

English-Serbian dictionary
Dampen
Ovlaziti-Utuci

Concise Oxford Thesaurus
dampen
▶ verb
the rain dampened her face: MOISTEN, damp, wet, dew, water; poetic/literary bedew.
nothing could dampen her enthusiasm: LESSEN, decrease, diminish, reduce, moderate, damp, put a damper on, throw cold water on, cool, discourage; suppress, extinguish, quench, stifle, curb, limit, check, restrain, inhibit, deter.

dry, heighten.

Merriam-Webster Collegiate® Dictionary
damp·en
Pronunciation: ‘dam-pən
Function: verb
Inflected Form: damp·ened ; damp·en·ing \’damp-niŋ, ‘dam-pə-\
Date: 1547

transitive verb
1 : to check or diminish the activity or vigor of : DEADEN 2 : to make damp 3 : DAMP 1C
intransitive verb
1 : to become damp
2 : to become deadened or depressed
–damp·en·er \-nər\ noun

Dampen was last modified: July 7th, 2021 by Jovan Stosic

Dampen


Concise Oxford English Dictionary
dampen
■ verb
make damp.
make less strong or intense. ▶reduce the amplitude of (a sound source).

dampener noun

EngMac
dampen
навлажнува, потиснува (чувства), се натопува; навлажува

English-Serbian dictionary
Dampen
Ovlaziti-Utuci

Concise Oxford Thesaurus
dampen
▶ verb
the rain dampened her face: MOISTEN, damp, wet, dew, water; poetic/literary bedew.
nothing could dampen her enthusiasm: LESSEN, decrease, diminish, reduce, moderate, damp, put a damper on, throw cold water on, cool, discourage; suppress, extinguish, quench, stifle, curb, limit, check, restrain, inhibit, deter.

dry, heighten.

Merriam-Webster Collegiate® Dictionary
damp·en
Pronunciation: ‘dam-pən
Function: verb
Inflected Form: damp·ened ; damp·en·ing \’damp-niŋ, ‘dam-pə-\
Date: 1547

transitive verb
1 : to check or diminish the activity or vigor of : DEADEN 2 : to make damp 3 : DAMP 1C
intransitive verb
1 : to become damp
2 : to become deadened or depressed
–damp·en·er \-nər\ noun

Dampen was last modified: June 29th, 2021 by Jovan Stosic

Oomph

Concise Oxford English Dictionary
oomph
(also umph)
■ noun informal the quality of being exciting, energetic, or sexually attractive.

1930s: perh. imitative.

EngMac
oomph
(n sl) енергија
oomph (n sl)
енергија

Merriam-Webster Collegiate® Dictionary
oomph
Pronunciation: ‘u̇m(p)f
Function: noun
Etymology: imitative of a sound made under exertion
Date: 1936

1 : personal charm or magnetism : GLAMOUR
2 : SEX APPEAL
3 : PUNCH, VITALITY

Oomph was last modified: June 25th, 2021 by Jovan Stosic

idempotent

element that does not change when multiplied by itself, element that satisfies the equation n x n = n (Mathematics)

 

idempotent was last modified: February 20th, 2021 by Jovan Stosic

xenophobia


Concise Oxford English Dictionary
xenophobia
■ noun intense or irrational dislike or fear of people from other countries.

xenophobe noun
xenophobic adjective

EngMac
xenophobia
ксенофобија; n. ксенофобија, омраза кон странци; омраза кон странци; ксенофобија, омраза, страв

English-Serbian dictionary
Xenophobia
Ksenofobija

Merriam-Webster Collegiate® Dictionary
xe·no·pho·bia
Pronunciation: ˌze-nə-‘fō-bē-ə, ˌzē-
Function: noun
Etymology: New Latin
Date: 1903

: fear and hatred of strangers or foreigners or of anything that is strange or foreign

xenophobia was last modified: May 23rd, 2020 by Jovan Stosic

Muzzle

Concise Oxford English Dictionary
muzzle
■ noun
the projecting part of the face, including the nose and mouth, of an animal such as a dog or horse. ▶a guard fitted over an animal’s muzzle to stop it biting or feeding.
the open end of the barrel of a firearm.
■ verb
put a muzzle on (an animal).
prevent from freedom of expression.

ME: from OFr. musel, dimin. of med. L. musum.

Concise Oxford Thesaurus
muzzle
▶ noun the dog’s velvety muzzle: SNOUT, nose, mouth, maw.
▶ verb attempts to muzzle the media: GAG, silence, censor, stifle, restrain, check, curb, fetter.

Merriam-Webster Collegiate® Dictionary
1muz·zle
Pronunciation: ‘mə-zəl
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English mosel, from Middle French musel, from Old French *mus mouth of an animal, from Medieval Latin musus
Date: 15th century

1 : the projecting jaws and nose of an animal : SNOUT
2 a : a fastening or covering for the mouth of an animal used to prevent eating or biting b : something (as censorship) that restrains normal expression
3 : the open end of an implement especially : the discharging end of a weapon

muzzle[1]
2muzzle
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form: muz·zled ; muz·zling \’məz-liŋ, ‘mə-zə-\
Date: 15th century

1 : to fit with a muzzle
2 a : GAG b : RESTRAIN, RESTRICT –muz·zler \-lər\ noun

Muzzle was last modified: April 23rd, 2020 by Jovan Stosic

Congenial | Definition of Congenial by Merriam-Webster

Definition of congenial

1a : pleasant especially : agreeably suited to one’s nature, tastes, or outlook a congenial atmosphere
b : sociable, geniala congenial host
c : existing or associated together harmoniously
2 : having the same nature, disposition, or tastes : kindredcongenial companions

Synonyms

agreeable, blessed (also blest), darling, delectable, delicious, delightful, delightsome, dreamy, dulcet, enjoyable, felicitous, good, grateful, gratifying, heavenly, jolly, luscious, nice, palatable, pleasant, pleasing, pleasurable, pretty, satisfying, savory (also savoury), sweet, tasty, welcome

Antonyms

disagreeable, pleasureless, unpalatable, unpleasant, unwelcome

Source: Congenial | Definition of Congenial by Merriam-Webster

Congenial | Definition of Congenial by Merriam-Webster was last modified: April 23rd, 2020 by Jovan Stosic

pathos


Concise Oxford English Dictionary
pathos
‘peɪθɒs
■ noun a quality that evokes pity or sadness.

C17: from Gk pathos ‘suffering’.

Concise Oxford Thesaurus
pathos
▶ noun POIGNANCY, tragedy, sadness, pitifulness, piteousness, pitiableness.

EngMac
pathos
патос

English-Serbian dictionary
Pathos
Patos

Merriam-Webster Collegiate® Dictionary
pa·thos
Pronunciation: ‘pā-ˌthäs, -ˌthȯs, -ˌthōs also ‘pa-
Function: noun
Etymology: Greek, suffering, experience, emotion, from paschein (aor. pathein) to experience, suffer; perhaps akin to Lithuanian kęsti to suffer
Date: 1591

1 : an element in experience or in artistic representation evoking pity or compassion
2 : an emotion of sympathetic pity

pathos was last modified: October 7th, 2019 by Jovan Stosic

gout

n
a painful inflammation of the big toe and foot caused by defects in uric acid metabolism resulting in deposits of the acid and its salts in the blood and joints
syn : gout, gouty arthritis, urarthritis

gout was last modified: September 18th, 2019 by Jovan Stosic

Instigate


Concise Oxford English Dictionary
instigate
‘ɪnstɪgeɪt
■ verb bring about or initiate. ▶(instigate someone to/to do something) incite someone to do something.

instigation noun
instigator noun

C16 (earlier (ME) as instigation): from L. instigat-, instigare ‘urge, incite’.

Concise Oxford Thesaurus
instigate
▶ verb
they instigated formal proceedings: SET IN MOTION, get under way, get off the ground, start, commence, begin, initiate, launch, institute, set up, inaugurate, establish, organize; actuate, generate, bring about; start the ball rolling; informal kick off.
he instigated men to refuse allegiance: INCITE, encourage, urge, goad, provoke, spur on, push, press, prompt, induce, prevail upon, motivate, influence, persuade, sway; informal put up to.

halt, dissuade.

EngMac
instigate
v. поттикнува, разговорува, подбуцнува; потстрек

English-Serbian dictionary
Instigate
Navoditi-Podsticati-Potpirivati-Potsticati

Merriam-Webster Collegiate® Dictionary
in·sti·gate
Pronunciation: ‘in(t)-stə-ˌgāt
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form: -gat·ed ; -gat·ing
Etymology: Latin instigatus, past participle of instigare ― more at STICK
Date: 1542

: to goad or urge forward : PROVOKE
synonyms see INCITE
–in·sti·ga·tion \ˌin(t)-stə-‘gā-shən\ noun
–in·sti·ga·tive \’in(t)-stə-ˌgā-tiv\ adjective
–in·sti·ga·tor \-ˌgā-tər\ noun

Instigate was last modified: September 7th, 2019 by Jovan Stosic